Reducing Maternal Mortality in the United States

By Sekou Sidibe

Did you know that an estimated 700 women die of pregnancy-related causes each year in the United States? Unfortunately, this is a real statistic. However, many of these deaths can be prevented. Strong, accurate data are critical for identifying opportunities for preventing deaths among mothers and designing effective interventions. Continue reading

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Ethiopia Drought: We can be the answer to untold prayers

By Michelle Nunn, President and CEO of CARE

Recently we’ve been hit with a seemingly ceaseless cycle of disastrous news – from the terrorist attacks in Belgium and Pakistan to the protracted crisis in Syria. The fact that Ethiopia is facing the worst drought in 30 years and that it threatens 10 million people might understandably be absorbed as just one more crisis to provoke despair.

But there is another dimension to this story. Continue reading

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World Health Day 2016: Beating Diabetes

By Katie Pace, Marketing Communications Officer, MAP International

We all hear a lot about the benefit of antibiotics and vitamins in third world countries, but what about chronic health issues– like diabetes. Last week, the World Health Organization focused its 2016 World Health Day on beating diabetes – a chronic disease that MAP and our partners have been fighting for decades. Continue reading

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Malaria Elimination to Inform Response to Other Disease Challenges on Hispaniola

This post also appears on the new Malaria Zero website. Visit the site to learn more about the program and view a photo slideshow.

Ouanaminthe, Haiti - Dr. Jean Denis, Director of the Department of Health, NE Region, in his office in Ouanaminthe, Haiti. Dr. Denis and his staff are key players in Haiti's efforts to eliminate malaria from within its borders, with the support of the Malaria Zero project.Located on the western half of the island of Hispaniola, Haiti is a Caribbean nation with a rich and storied history. As the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere, Haiti is also beset with a range of economic, development and public health challenges, and remains, along with neighboring Dominican Republic, the last stronghold of endemic malaria in the Caribbean.

“Malaria is a responsibility we carry because it is an endemic disease in Haiti,” said Dr. Jean Denis, director of the Department of Public Health and Population for Haiti’s Northeast Region. Continue reading

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Syria: What to do with refugees? Start with a message of hope.

By Michelle Nunn, President & CEO of CARE

CARE President & CEO Michelle Nunn

CARE President & CEO Michelle Nunn

*Note: This article previously ran on 3/15/2016 on Huffington Post.

For five years, the world has watched, with varying degrees of attention, the civil discord in Syria erupt into the largest humanitarian disaster in a generation. Advocates in Syria have cried out for global leadership, the international community has called for the cessation of hostilities, and organizations leading the humanitarian response have pleaded for support. And yet, this last year has been the most violent and destructive.

The UN and non-governmental organizations are receiving less than half of the assistance they say is necessary for a minimal response to the enormous suffering. Continue reading

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MAP International Travels to Rural Guatemala to Provide Relief

By Katie Pace, Communications Officer at MAP International

Katie Pace, Marketing Communications Officer, MAP International

Katie Pace, Marketing Communications Officer, MAP International

Last month, a team from MAP International traveled from Georgia to rural Guatemala. We teamed up with Vine International to provide needed medicines to very remote areas in the western part of the country.  Those medicines included children’s vitamins, antibiotics, prenatal vitamins, heart disease medications and many other vital medicines.

Over the course of six days our team visited eight clinics and travelled hundreds of  miles on rough mountainous roads. Some of the clinics we visited were so remote — with roads either limited or nonexistent — that physicians travelled by horse to treat patients. Continue reading

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A Unified Effort: Working to Address Zika Virus

By Judy Monroe, M.D.

Jude Monroe, President & CEO of the CDC Foundation

Judy Monroe, President & CEO of the CDC Foundation

We’ve all seen the alarming stories recently about the Zika virus outbreak in many countries and territories in the Americas, the likelihood that the virus will continue to spread to new areas, and the potentially serious implications for pregnant women and their unborn children. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has been working closely with its U.S. and international partners on the response.

In a TIME interview last week, CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden discussed Zika virus and CDC’s response efforts. Around 500 CDC staff are hard at work with domestic and international partners to search out answers to many questions. Continue reading

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What we really need to combat the Zika virus

By Christina Wegs, CARE’s Senior Advisor for Global Policy, Sexual, Reproductive and Maternal Health and Rights; and Stephanie Ogden, CARE’s Senior Water Policy Advisor

Christina Wegs, Senior Advisor for Global Policy, Sexual, Reproductive and Maternal Health and Rights, CARE

Christina Wegs, Senior Advisor for Global Policy, Sexual, Reproductive and Maternal Health and Rights, CARE

As concerns about the Zika virus spread worldwide, one thing is clear:  the world’s poorest women will bear the brunt of the mosquito-borne disease and its consequences, and will have the fewest resources to fight it.

On Feb. 1 the World Health Organization declared the Zika virus a “public health emergency of international concern.”  The virus has been linked to congenital microcephaly, a rare birth defect that causes brain damage and lifelong disability. 

Zika has been steadily spreading across Latin America and the Caribbean. More than 20 countries are currently battling outbreaks of the virus, which has no cure or vaccine.  The WHO warns that as many as 4 million people can be infected by the end of the year. Continue reading

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Partnerships of Health & Hope, Saving Lives One Box at a Time

By Katie Pace, Marketing & Communications Officer, MAP International

Katie Pace, Marketing Communications Officer, MAP International

Katie Pace, Marketing Communications Officer, MAP International

For over 20 years, MAP International’s Medical Mission Packs Program has provided essential medicines and medical supplies to improve the health and wellbeing of children and families around the world. Since its inception, nearly 44,000 MMPs have been provided to US physicians and medical personnel, providing medical aid to children and families in over 120 countries.

Each year, 5.9 million children die from preventable diseases.  That means millions of mothers are unable to provide basic healthcare items for their children.  Thankfully, this lifesaving partnership is doing something about that by providing lifesaving antibiotics and other items that improve their quality of life.  MAP is the middleman, the connector between physicians doing lifesaving work and the medicines that they so desperately need. Continue reading

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Working Together to Eliminate Healthcare-associated Infections

By Alison Thompson, director of public-private partnerships, CDC Foundation

Alison Thompson, director of public-private partnerships, CDC Foundation

Alison Thompson, director of public-private partnerships, CDC Foundation

Did you know that on any given day, one in every 25 hospital patients in the United States has at least one infection due to their medical care? One of the reasons is that adherence to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) hand hygiene recommendations is low, ranging between 20 and 40 percent, according to studies.

Healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) are infections that people acquire while receiving treatment for another condition in a health care setting. HAI statistics reflect the need for healthcare providers to follow infection control guidance including practicing hand hygiene at key points in time to disrupt the transmission of microorganisms to patients, visitors and healthcare workers. Patients and their loved ones can also play a role in helping to prevent infections by practicing good hand hygiene themselves as well as asking or reminding their healthcare providers to perform hand hygiene. Continue reading

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