Fighting Zika, Empowering Pregnant Women

ZikaPregnancy

CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden said recently that nothing about fighting the Zika virus is going to be easy or quick. Controlling the Aedes species mosquito is hard, and although we’re learning a lot quickly, there is still a lot we don’t know. Clearly, there is an urgent need to both learn more and do more—and all of us have a role to play. Continue reading

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World Humanitarian Summit: Indecision is not an option

By Gareth Price Jones, CARE’s Senior Humanitarian Policy and Advocacy Coordinator

With humanitarian crises in the Middle East, Africa and Asia having reached the shores of Europe — and in some ways the U.S. — political attention is finally fixed at what is perhaps the greatest challenge of our time: Reversing the trend of ever-greater numbers of people deprived and displaced by war or natural disasters, and the failure to provide them the dignified assistance they need. The World Humanitarian Summit in Istanbul May 23-24 offers an historic opportunity to address that challenge. Continue reading

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The Philanthropic Side of Pharma

By Chase Bourke, PhD

It’s easy to get the wrong impression about the pharmaceutical industry. Greedy entrepreneurs like Martin Shkreli make headlines for shamelessly inflating the prices of life-saving drugs. Politicians campaign on reducing the high cost of prescription medicines. Continue reading

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The World Moves Closer to Polio Eradication with Oral Vaccine ‘Switch’ and Containment of Laboratory Samples

By Dave Ross, ScD, President and Chief Executive Officer, The Task Force for Global Health

With polio eradication on the horizon, The Task Force for Global Health has been assisting the World Health Organization (WHO) and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) in coordinating immunization and containment activities vital to wiping out the disease permanently. Continue reading

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Reducing Maternal Mortality in the United States

By Sekou Sidibe

Did you know that an estimated 700 women die of pregnancy-related causes each year in the United States? Unfortunately, this is a real statistic. However, many of these deaths can be prevented. Strong, accurate data are critical for identifying opportunities for preventing deaths among mothers and designing effective interventions. Continue reading

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Ethiopia Drought: We can be the answer to untold prayers

By Michelle Nunn, President and CEO of CARE

Recently we’ve been hit with a seemingly ceaseless cycle of disastrous news – from the terrorist attacks in Belgium and Pakistan to the protracted crisis in Syria. The fact that Ethiopia is facing the worst drought in 30 years and that it threatens 10 million people might understandably be absorbed as just one more crisis to provoke despair.

But there is another dimension to this story. Continue reading

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World Health Day 2016: Beating Diabetes

By Katie Pace, Marketing Communications Officer, MAP International

We all hear a lot about the benefit of antibiotics and vitamins in third world countries, but what about chronic health issues– like diabetes. Last week, the World Health Organization focused its 2016 World Health Day on beating diabetes – a chronic disease that MAP and our partners have been fighting for decades. Continue reading

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Malaria Elimination to Inform Response to Other Disease Challenges on Hispaniola

This post also appears on the new Malaria Zero website. Visit the site to learn more about the program and view a photo slideshow.

Ouanaminthe, Haiti - Dr. Jean Denis, Director of the Department of Health, NE Region, in his office in Ouanaminthe, Haiti. Dr. Denis and his staff are key players in Haiti's efforts to eliminate malaria from within its borders, with the support of the Malaria Zero project.Located on the western half of the island of Hispaniola, Haiti is a Caribbean nation with a rich and storied history. As the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere, Haiti is also beset with a range of economic, development and public health challenges, and remains, along with neighboring Dominican Republic, the last stronghold of endemic malaria in the Caribbean.

“Malaria is a responsibility we carry because it is an endemic disease in Haiti,” said Dr. Jean Denis, director of the Department of Public Health and Population for Haiti’s Northeast Region. Continue reading

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Syria: What to do with refugees? Start with a message of hope.

By Michelle Nunn, President & CEO of CARE

CARE President & CEO Michelle Nunn

CARE President & CEO Michelle Nunn

*Note: This article previously ran on 3/15/2016 on Huffington Post.

For five years, the world has watched, with varying degrees of attention, the civil discord in Syria erupt into the largest humanitarian disaster in a generation. Advocates in Syria have cried out for global leadership, the international community has called for the cessation of hostilities, and organizations leading the humanitarian response have pleaded for support. And yet, this last year has been the most violent and destructive.

The UN and non-governmental organizations are receiving less than half of the assistance they say is necessary for a minimal response to the enormous suffering. Continue reading

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MAP International Travels to Rural Guatemala to Provide Relief

By Katie Pace, Communications Officer at MAP International

Katie Pace, Marketing Communications Officer, MAP International

Katie Pace, Marketing Communications Officer, MAP International

Last month, a team from MAP International traveled from Georgia to rural Guatemala. We teamed up with Vine International to provide needed medicines to very remote areas in the western part of the country.  Those medicines included children’s vitamins, antibiotics, prenatal vitamins, heart disease medications and many other vital medicines.

Over the course of six days our team visited eight clinics and travelled hundreds of  miles on rough mountainous roads. Some of the clinics we visited were so remote — with roads either limited or nonexistent — that physicians travelled by horse to treat patients. Continue reading

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